16.2 - End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children.

Overview

 

 

On this page you will find some background information about the Partnership. At this stage, this is primarily provided to give you the information you need for our online consultation.

 

For more details on the partnership, please read our Options Paper. More details on this can be found below.

 

Background

 

Why do we need a new partnership?

 

A number of partners have come together to explore the potential for a global partnership to end violence against children. The primary purpose of the partnership should be delivery of SDG 16.2 (End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children) and other relevant SDG targets (5.2, 5.3, 8.7, etc.) For further information on the Sustainable Development Goals and the post-2015 development agenda, click here.

16.2 - End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children.

Governments have called for multi-stakeholder partnerships to play a central role in mobilizing and sharing knowledge, expertise, technologies, and financial resources to support the delivery of the SDGs. (For further information on global partnerships, click here.) Some corporations in the adult entertainment industry have even offered their pledge to our cause, as well as go the extra mile to ensure that all actors or models that appear in online content are at least 18 years of age. In addition, these companies ensure that they have a 2257 statement prominently visibile on their homepage

 

A Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children offers an opportunity to help governments, international organizations, civil society, faith leaders, the private sector, philanthropists and foundations, researchers and academics work together to confront the unacceptable levels of violence that children suffer. (For further information on violence against children, click here.)

Partners are united by the conviction that all violence against children is unacceptable and that children have the right to a life free from fear. And they also believe that all violence is preventable - we have a growing understanding about which solutions are most effective in keeping children safe. (For further information on how to prevent violence, click here)

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What will the Partnership do?

We envisage that the partnership will operate at:

A global level - building the political will to invest in the policies, institutions, standards, and programmes that most cost effectively prevent and address violence against children.

Nationally, enabling countries of all income levels to prevent and address violence more effectively.

As a movement, changing the attitudes and social norms that tolerate violence, with children playing a central role (For further information on child participation, click here.)

We, however, want your views. We have commissioned a paper from the NYU Center on International Cooperation that sets out options for the Partnership - and hope you will read it if you have time.

Please also read our report on the recent stakeholder consultation we held. A further consultation is planned for Fall 2015.

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Options Paper

 

*Note: Full Options Paper at end of page

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On 11 June 2015, partners from the international system, from national governments, and from civil society met for the first time to discuss a proposal to establish a Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children and an associated Fund.

 

The meeting discussed a paper, prepared by an independent expert, which sets out options for the partnership’s strategy and governance. Participants strongly supported the need for the partnership, given the unacceptable levels of violence that children suffer, and there was broad agreement about its overall purpose, scope and membership.

 

All partners recognized that urgent action is needed to seize the opportunity represented by the Third International Conference on Financing for Development (Addis Ababa, July), the UN Summit to adopt the post-2015 development agenda (New York, September) and the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in January 2016.

 

Beyond that, the partnership should have demonstrated its added value and viability by the time of the High Level Political Forum in September 2017, and to be able to provide evidence of impact by the end of 2020.

Designing the Partnership

There was broad agreement on the following points.

 

The primary purpose of the partnership should be delivery of SDG16.2 (end abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and all forms of violence and torture against children) and other relevant SDG targets (5.2, 5.3, 8.7, etc.), based on a commitment to protecting children’s rights and to the principle that no violence against children is justifiable and all violence is preventable.

 

At a global level, the priority is to build political will to invest in the policies, institutions, standards and programmes that most cost effectively prevent and address violence against children, with all sectors playing a full role. Policymakers must be convinced that it is possible to transform societies to make them safer for children.

Nationally, the partnership must enable countries of all income levels to show leadership, given that children experience unacceptable levels of violence in all countries. Initially, the partnership should work with those countries that are committed to demonstrating to others what can be achieved.

The partnership must also build a movement, in which children play a central role, that will work to change the attitudes and social norms that tolerate violence, and which enlist growing numbers of organizations and individuals in reducing the dangers that children face.

 

There was also...

A strong commitment to agreeing and adhering to clear principles of partnership, enabling partners to work productively together, while managing areas of conflicting interest.

Willingness to form a small guiding coalition that would take responsibility for designing the partnership, with representation from governments and the international system, civil society organizations with a global reach, and from the private sector.

Recognition of the importance of inclusivity, with support for an early consultation on the partnership’s strategy that will be open to all those who are working to protect children, and detailed analysis of options to allow children to play a leadership role in the partnership.

Acceptance that governance arrangements must evolve over time, as the partnership’s needs change and grow, but that a well-resourced secretariat would be needed from the beginning, drawing in part on secondments from all partner organizations.

Setting up the Fund

 

A Fund to End Violence Against Children has been proposed. This will be associated with the partnership, but will have separate governance arrangements.

 

There was general agreement that:

 

There is an urgent need to make the case that child victims of violence are the most likely to be left behind by the post-2015 agenda, due to the immediate consequences of the violence they suffer and its long lasting impact on their health, education, wellbeing and prosperity.

Policymakers must be convinced that a failure to tackle violence against children leads to substantial economic losses, while decreasing the effectiveness of expenditure on child survival and development. There is a strong economic case for investment in violence prevention.

A fund can have a catalytic role in demonstrating how violence against children can most effectively be reduced, leverage new sources of investment, and help build a global, national and local movement to end violence.

 

UNICEF has proposed hosting the Fund as a trust account, with an independent Steering Committee, an Allocation Committee that could be linked to the partnership, and Secretariat, with the Fund operated within its Division of Financial Administration and Management. This would allow the Fund to make disbursements directly to civil society organizations, as well as to governments and international organizations. This proposal will be discussed in more detail at a future meeting.

 

Further Work

Immediate priorities are to:

 

Identify how the partnership can most effectively add value to existing activity, and determine the priorities it should pursue in its early years. This will allow a draft strategy to be developed for further discussion by partners.

Consult widely with all stakeholders (governments, international organizations, civil society, faith leaders, the private sector, the research and academic community, etc.), while enabling children to be safely and meaningfully involved in the design of the partnership, and its decision-making, activities, and campaigning.

Explore with governments and other national stakeholders the role that countries can play as pathfinders within the new partnership, with the aim of gaining commitment from six countries to launch a national process that will determine their priorities for, and mode of engagement in, the partnership.

Debate the scope, strategy and governance of the Fund, based on further consultations on financial flows, the Fund’s role, and its relationship to the partnership.

 

For full Options Paper please click the link below.

Overview  Consultation